Temperatures In Australia Hit 117 Degrees As Sydney Sees Hottest Day In 78 Years

A brutal heat wave in Australia skyrocketed temperatures in Sydney on Sunday to 117 degrees Fahrenheit (47.3 Celsius), making it the hottest weather New South Wales’ capital has seen in 78 years, weather officials said.

The bizarre forecast follows record low temperatures in other parts of the world.

The worst of the weekend’s heat was recorded in the Sydney suburb of Penrith where the triple-degree temperature was just slightly lower than a 118-degree (47.8 C) reading recorded in the town of Richmond in 1939, according to the New South Wales’ Bureau of Meteorology.

James D. Morgan via Getty Images
Crowds cool off in water at Yarra Bay in Sydney, Australia, on Sunday amid a heat wave.

Temperatures became so hot across southern Australia that police in the neighboring state of Victoria warned drivers on Twitter that a 6-mile freeway was “melting.”

Fire warnings and bans were also issued across Sydney in response to the high heat threat that has caused multiple wildfires. There was also an air quality warning issued by the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage for higher than normal ozone levels, according to The Sydney Morning Herald.

 

Adding to some of the misery felt, a power outage left thousands of people in Sydney without electricity on Sunday evening as temperatures stayed between 91 and 113 degrees Fahrenheit, the local news site reported.

A spokeswoman for local electricity provider Ausgrid, speaking to Australia’s Special Broadcasting Service, partially blamed the outage on a surge in power use.

 

The bizarre weather isn’t just in Australia, however.

Across the Pacific, Alaska has experienced unusually warm temperatures in recent days, roughly 10 to 20 degrees above average, prompting concerns about ice levels, NPR reported.

Last week, temperatures in Anchorage were warmer than in northern Florida, which saw snow.

The U.S.′ northeast has also endured unseasonably cold temperatures, with the mercury dipping below zero in many places. At New York City’s John F. Kennedy International Airport, the area saw an all-time low on Saturday of 8 degrees F, meteorologist Bob Oravec of the Weather Prediction Center, told Reuters.

 

Temperatures are expected to rise to above normal temperatures for much of the United States in the middle of January, the National Weather Service said on Sunday.

Meanwhile, World Meteorological Organization spokesperson Clare Nullis pointed out on Friday that Europe is also experiencing unusual temperatures.

“The French national average on Wednesday was 11.5 degrees Celsius [52.7 degrees Fahrenheit], so that’s about 6 degrees Celsius above the normal, so as I said, lots of extreme weather,” she said during a United Nations session, according to Newsweek.

 

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/sydney-sees-hottest-day-in-78-years_us_5a522adee4b089e14dbb94e0

Smart faucets join the Internet of Things

Working with Amazon’s Alexa, Delta’s smart faucet responds to your voice.

Image: delta faucet company

Everything’s voice-activated these days — even the kitchen sink.

The Delta Faucet Company announced Friday it’s developing faucets that respond to voice commands. Along with turning off and on, they’ll be able to measure amounts of water for cooking, and warm water, too. 

It’s all possible thanks to Wi-Fi and Amazon Alexa.

Mike Sale, Delta Faucet’s senior research and design product development manager, said in a call this week that the sink designers took a page from early voice-enabled lights and HVAC systems that could turn on with a simple command. 

“If you don’t do it with voice, you’ve got a mess of dials,” Sale said. Voice technology also keeps the design sleek with the engine and valve under the sink and the internet-connected components also tucked away.  

“When your faucet responds — that’s not something anyone has really seen,” Sale said.

The technology, which is still undergoing testing and development, is expected to come to market later this year, and is currently installed in trial homes. 

We’ve already seen voice-controlled TV remote controls, cars, light switches, and thermostats. And the smart home is only going to grow in 2018, as Mashable Tech Editor Pete Pachal noted in his CES preview

Read more: http://mashable.com/2018/01/05/iot-voice-control-delta-faucet-sink/